Typically, the people who seek help for their teens are those who care about them enough to take proactive steps toward their health and well-being. Just by visiting this website, you are to be commended on making that first step. 

We understand that most teens and their family members feel scared, frustrated, overwhelmed, angry, and helpless. Addiction affects the entire family - anyone who loves and cares about the addict. Rehab for Teens is a resource for finding help to guide you through this state of confusion and help in the transition to a healthier, more meaningful connection with your family member or loved one.

The year 2013 marks a place in history where teenagers have more access to the digital world than ever before. With the explosion of social media, teenagers find themselves in the midst of making moral and ethical decisions just by pressing SEND.

Unfortunately, with this type of accessibility, teenagers are more often than not confronted with tougher than ever pressure from their peers to become involved in high risk behaviors. Behaviors which include high risks of using and even selling or distributing drugs and alcohol have become a widespread concern.

Today’s teens are at a great risk for substance use/ abuse due to peer pressure, media, and accessibility. According to the 2009 Prevention Needs Assessment Student Survey, almost 16 percent of young people admitted to taking a drug within the last 30 days. That is only the ones who admitted to it on the survey. The actual percent is certainly higher.

If you are considering rehab for your teen, there are some hard realities that you as a parent will most likely face. A plan of care will not work if your teen is not on board to receive the help that is being offered. This is one of the hardest truths about rehabilitation. Rehabilitation means to restore. Your teen must really want help if he intends to lead a sober lifestyle.

Finding the right treatment program involves careful consideration of many factors, including setting, length of care, philosophical approach, and the ability to meet the patient's unique needs. This site provides a treatment facility locator to help you find the right alternatives for your teen. While we do not endorse any of the sites promoted here, it is our intent to be a nationwide community resource.  

Good luck in your search for help for your teen. 

Check out our BLOG below to stay updated on common issues and concerns with

Rehab for Teens.  

Philip Seymour Hoffman

by James on March 1, 2014 0 Comments

The official cause of death has been established nearly four weeks after his death. The late actor, 46 when he passed away earlier this month, died with a hypodermic needle in his arm of "accidental acute mixed drug intoxication, including heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and amphetamine," the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner confirmed. 

There has been a lot of talk about Hoffman on social media. Some are saddened by his death, others are outraged. There is no doubt in my mind that Hoffman was an intelligent man and a talented actor. I am sad for his family, his children. 

But I am mostly concerned. I am concerned that yet another celebrity has died like this in the past few months. Mixing uppers and downers is lethal. Drugs are altered. Heroin laced with Fentanyl which is a real powerful opiate pain killer that people usually wear in a ...

read more

Smoking Pot Effects the Brain

by James on January 31, 2014 0 Comments

More and more teenagers don't see why smoking pot is a big deal; it's legal in some states, so why not? Here's any excellent article why adolescents don't have all the facts about marijuana and it's use.

http://healthland.time.com/2014/01/23/why-its-still-a-big-deal-if-your-teen-smokes-pot/?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=cf3341c81a-JT_Daily_News_Growing_Number_of_Localities&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_97f4d27738-cf3341c81a-221307577#ixzz2rhzJBnAq

Know the Signs

by James on January 31, 2014 0 Comments

What would you think if your teen came home with bottles of cough medicine, but wasn’t ill? Would you think twice about it? Learn the warning signs: http://stopmedicineabuse.org/what-does-abuse-look-like

signs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy marijuana use causes poor memory and abnormal brain structure, study says

by James on December 16, 2013 0 Comments

Teenagers who smoked marijuana daily for three years performed poorly on memory tasks and showed abnormal changes in brain structure,according to a Northwestern Medicine study.

Researchers in Chicago observed the brains of teenagers who were heavy users of marijuana. In those individuals, memory-related structures in the brain appeared to shrink and collapse inward, possibly indicating a decrease in neurons.

These abnormalities were recorded two years after the teens stopped using marijuana, possibly indicating long-term effects, and look similar to schizophrenia-related brain abnormalities.

The brains were shaped more abnormally for individuals who began marijuana use at a younger age, according to the reports, which suggest that memory regions of the brain are more susceptible to the drug at earlier ages.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/12/heavy-marijuana-use-causes-poor-memory-and-abnormal-brain-structure-study-says.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsofficial&utm_campaign=newshour

Out of Reach

by James on October 10, 2013 0 Comments

"Out of Reach" is a special documentary created by a teen filmmaker who captures the issue of teen prescription drug abuse as it exists in his world. The issues contained in the film are a reflection of this issue across the country. It was created in collaboration with director Tucker Capps (of A&E’s “Intervention”) and The Partnership at Drugfree.org's Medicine Abuse Project.
 
View the trailer above, and email communications@drugfree.org for more information about how you can help #EndMedicineAbuse by sharing the full film and an accompanying "Out of Reach" toolkit with your friends, schools, communities, families and more.

Mixing Heroin with other Drugs

by James on July 16, 2013 0 Comments

Somehow I knew when the announcement came of a celeb's recent death that a mix of heroin and some other substance must be involved. A recent survey showed only 21% of fatal overdoses came about through using heroin alone. 

Most heroin users think they know their bodies well enough to manage. But different substances combined cause different reactions to the body. For instance heroin and alcohol both suppress the central nervous system. While mixing cocaine with heroin known as a speed ball creates a different type of reaction. Either way, all unhealthy, even deadly. 

The grief, the shock, the blame, the hurt, the questions and the stigma are what is left for those of us left behind when a child or family member accidentally overdoes. 

I am always saddened when I learn of such accidental overdoses. Saddened that someone who seemed to have so much must have been ...

read more

Data on Drug Related Emergency Departments from SAMSHA

by James on April 1, 2013 0 Comments

 

Highlights of the 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) Findings on Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits

In Brief
  • In 2011, there were 5.1 million drug-related emergency department (ED) visits; about one half (49 percent) were attributed to drug misuse or abuse with a nearly equal percentage (45 percent) attributed to adverse drug reactions
  • ED visits involving use of illicit drugs were relatively stable from 2004 (991,640 visits) to 2009 (974,392 visits) but increased from 2009 to 2011 (1,252,500 visits); between 2009 and 2011, the rate of visits involving illicit stimulants increased 68 percent, and the rate of visits involving marijuana rose 19 percent
  • ED visits involving misuse or abuse of pharmaceuticals increased from 2004 (626,470 visits) through 2011 (1,428,145 visits); the most commonly involved drugs were anti-anxiety and insomnia medications and narcotic pain relievers (160.9 and 134.8 visits per 100,000 ...
read more

Drug Addiction Effects the Brain

by James on March 15, 2013 0 Comments

Drug addiction begins with a compulsive drive to take a drug despite the consequences. While traditionally viewed as experimentation in teen years or simply "bad choices", recent studies indicate that repeated drug use leads to long lasting changes in the brain that effect voluntary control. 

As parents we want to give our children benefit of doubt, especially when they come at us with questions like "Why don't you just trust me?" We so want to believe in our children, but the truth is that they have to earn our trust. Even smart kids do drugs. A child's brain does not fully develop until about the age of 25 and even longer in some boys. How can we expect them to act like adults when they physiologically haven't even fully grown into an adult.  Adolescence is a hard time to assess what is normal. It's important to ...

read more
Page 1 of 1.

Philip Seymour Hoffman

by James on March 1, 2014 0 Comments

The official cause of death has been established nearly four weeks after his death. The late actor, 46 when he passed away earlier this month, died with a hypodermic needle in his arm of "accidental acute mixed drug intoxication, including heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and amphetamine," the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner confirmed. 

There has been a lot of talk about Hoffman on social media. Some are saddened by his death, others are outraged. There is no doubt in my mind that Hoffman was an intelligent man and a talented actor. I am sad for his family, his children. 

But I am mostly concerned. I am concerned that yet another celebrity has died like this in the past few months. Mixing uppers and downers is lethal. Drugs are altered. Heroin laced with Fentanyl which is a real powerful opiate pain killer that people usually wear in a ...

read more

Smoking Pot Effects the Brain

by James on January 31, 2014 0 Comments

More and more teenagers don't see why smoking pot is a big deal; it's legal in some states, so why not? Here's any excellent article why adolescents don't have all the facts about marijuana and it's use.

http://healthland.time.com/2014/01/23/why-its-still-a-big-deal-if-your-teen-smokes-pot/?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=cf3341c81a-JT_Daily_News_Growing_Number_of_Localities&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_97f4d27738-cf3341c81a-221307577#ixzz2rhzJBnAq

Know the Signs

by James on January 31, 2014 0 Comments

What would you think if your teen came home with bottles of cough medicine, but wasn’t ill? Would you think twice about it? Learn the warning signs: http://stopmedicineabuse.org/what-does-abuse-look-like

signs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy marijuana use causes poor memory and abnormal brain structure, study says

by James on December 16, 2013 0 Comments

Teenagers who smoked marijuana daily for three years performed poorly on memory tasks and showed abnormal changes in brain structure,according to a Northwestern Medicine study.

Researchers in Chicago observed the brains of teenagers who were heavy users of marijuana. In those individuals, memory-related structures in the brain appeared to shrink and collapse inward, possibly indicating a decrease in neurons.

These abnormalities were recorded two years after the teens stopped using marijuana, possibly indicating long-term effects, and look similar to schizophrenia-related brain abnormalities.

The brains were shaped more abnormally for individuals who began marijuana use at a younger age, according to the reports, which suggest that memory regions of the brain are more susceptible to the drug at earlier ages.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/12/heavy-marijuana-use-causes-poor-memory-and-abnormal-brain-structure-study-says.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsofficial&utm_campaign=newshour

Out of Reach

by James on October 10, 2013 0 Comments

"Out of Reach" is a special documentary created by a teen filmmaker who captures the issue of teen prescription drug abuse as it exists in his world. The issues contained in the film are a reflection of this issue across the country. It was created in collaboration with director Tucker Capps (of A&E’s “Intervention”) and The Partnership at Drugfree.org's Medicine Abuse Project.
 
View the trailer above, and email communications@drugfree.org for more information about how you can help #EndMedicineAbuse by sharing the full film and an accompanying "Out of Reach" toolkit with your friends, schools, communities, families and more.

Mixing Heroin with other Drugs

by James on July 16, 2013 0 Comments

Somehow I knew when the announcement came of a celeb's recent death that a mix of heroin and some other substance must be involved. A recent survey showed only 21% of fatal overdoses came about through using heroin alone. 

Most heroin users think they know their bodies well enough to manage. But different substances combined cause different reactions to the body. For instance heroin and alcohol both suppress the central nervous system. While mixing cocaine with heroin known as a speed ball creates a different type of reaction. Either way, all unhealthy, even deadly. 

The grief, the shock, the blame, the hurt, the questions and the stigma are what is left for those of us left behind when a child or family member accidentally overdoes. 

I am always saddened when I learn of such accidental overdoses. Saddened that someone who seemed to have so much must have been ...

read more

Beyond hope?

by James on June 8, 2013 0 Comments

Yesterday, I yelled at my 19 year old son. He is a drug addict. He is an alcoholic. He is a liar and he is a thief. But he is still my son and I love him. 

I had to yell. He had to know how frustrated I am. How beyond hope I am. How close I am ready to giving up. Five years of rehabs, and this past year he has been kicked out of one apartment after another. And now most recently kicked out of his girlfriend's house, too. I have paid for motel rooms for the past few weeks. He doesn't seem to have hit bottom yet. What will it take?

I told him, if he wasn't working he would have to do volunteer work until he found a job. He would work just like everyone else 8:30-4:30 every day Monday through ...

read more

Data on Drug Related Emergency Departments from SAMSHA

by James on April 1, 2013 0 Comments

 

Highlights of the 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) Findings on Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits

In Brief
  • In 2011, there were 5.1 million drug-related emergency department (ED) visits; about one half (49 percent) were attributed to drug misuse or abuse with a nearly equal percentage (45 percent) attributed to adverse drug reactions
  • ED visits involving use of illicit drugs were relatively stable from 2004 (991,640 visits) to 2009 (974,392 visits) but increased from 2009 to 2011 (1,252,500 visits); between 2009 and 2011, the rate of visits involving illicit stimulants increased 68 percent, and the rate of visits involving marijuana rose 19 percent
  • ED visits involving misuse or abuse of pharmaceuticals increased from 2004 (626,470 visits) through 2011 (1,428,145 visits); the most commonly involved drugs were anti-anxiety and insomnia medications and narcotic pain relievers (160.9 and 134.8 visits per 100,000 ...
read more

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